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Speaking fundamentally: Chronic pain

Some fundamentals we use to manage our chronic pain
When in pain distract the brain This is like a fundamental rule of pain. When we ruminate on the pain? It is like we become saturated with it. Like it consumes our brain. Because pain is inherently a distraction. It already takes our attention naturally. And it makes certain things more difficult to do as a result. More pain, less concentration, focus, and memory. At a certain level, we can do other things and distract some of that attention from the pain. But when the level exceeds a certain point, which is different for everyone, we can no longer do so.
We all have things we do to distract the brain. I love to read or write. Other play video games, knit, color or garden. Not to mention work, which comes with its own set of complications, is also a fine distraction as well... there are perks to work with chronic pain certainly when one has the capacity to do it.
Moderation Moderation is something where we learn this pain, fatigue a…
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The manual: Brain Fog Recommendations

When 'can't' can'ts us right out of life

I know isolation. I know hermiting. I know not doing anything because I was in pain and doing things would aggravate it. I know how this leads to can't-ing ourselves right out of things we want to do... but don't have the energy or feel it will trigger pain so we decide just not to do it. I've been there. And in the end, you just don't do anything as a result.


I do it. I think many of us do it. Here is the warning. I hermited for a few years. More than a few when my pain wasn't being managed. And it isn't good for a person, even an introvert. We need to get out and about once in a while and socialize.
So sometimes we have to get out of that comfort zone a little and find ways to engage more in the world.
Things I do:
Go for walks (get me out of the house)Coffee with my momCoffee with a an old co-workerGame night with friendsKaraoke night (I am there for support... no one needs to hear me sing. lol) Did a paint night one night. Going to try that again. I…

Guest post: How to Change Your Life to Reduce Your Chronic Pain

Image via Pixabay by ronymichaud While doctors can meet with patients who suffer from chronic pain and recommend treatments and medication, the patients themselves have the power to minimize their chronic pain if they make a few lifestyle changes. Sometimes, even small shifts in home life can have significant impacts on the amount of pain you experience. We share some of the most effective ways you can change your life to reduce your chronic pain here.
Use the Power of Water There are three changes you can make with water to reduce your chronic pain: drink more of it, spend more time soaking it in, and listen to it. If you drink enough water to achieve healthy levels of hydration, you will relieve your headaches, joint pain, and stiffness. Other drinks like soda, coffee, tea, and alcohol promote fluid loss, just as a diet rich in protein and fat does. If you are taking joint supplements like glycosaminoglycans, you need to be drinking water to optimize their effectiveness.
As for spen…

Living in a backwards world

One thing I have learned living with a chronic illness is that it is perceived as a weakness. Often as something you should be able to 'control'. Often as something you should try to 'cure'. Often as something you should have been able to 'prevent' and it is somehow your fault that you are ill to begin with.

Yet chronic illnesses are rather common, so this seems sort of out of place thinking.

And we, it seems have little place in society. People are put out of place having to accommodate for us. I have been refused accommodation because I do not have a 'physical' disability. I assume that meant not a visible one or a common one. I have likewise not had accommodation because the office itself was simply not designed for it... so it wouldn't work. Wasn't in the planning for people to think about those that might need ergonomically correct environments. Since I wasn't even sure it would do anything since I had, again, never been o…

Fibromyalgia Awareness Day: things I learned

Today is Fibromyalgia Awareness day which is important to me because I have, officially, had FM from twenty years now. It is a condition that involves malfunctioning pain processing and as such is a chronic pain condition. It also has issues with insomnia, cognitive dysfunction, and fatigue.
Here are some things I know about FM from just my experience with it personally.

1) There was and still is a lot of stigma surrounding it. A lot of 'it is in your head' business. Doctors themselves didn't believe it at one time and I mean not too long ago. I encountered this medical stigma when I was younger myself. Went to the ER with chest pains (Costochondritis, not only seen in FM by the way but a painful chest wall condition) and was turned away with no tests at all because he didn't 'believe in FM' and, therefore, me. There is mounting research to show in fact it is a valid syndrome and there is actually a blood test on the market to identify it (only in the US as fa…

Fibromyalgia Awareness Day

Things to do on Fibromyalgia Awareness Day May12th
Share Awareness imagesWear purple and share on social media
Links to check out:World Fibromyalgia Awareness Day Is May 12: Spread the WordMay12th.orgMay12 Awareness on FacebookFor Bloggers there is the May 12the blog bomb that has been going on since 2014. Blog Bomb #May12BlogBomb
Resources:National Fibromyalgia AssociationNational Fibromyalgia and Chronic Pain AssociationFibromyalgia Action UK


Monday Manual: Brain Fog

Tangled: Depression and pain

One thing I can tell you about coping is that I like to learn things the hard way. I think we all struggle from time to time due to certain circumstances in our lives. For certain I can say chronic pain management matters. There was a time several years ago when I had no chronic pain management and I suffered. This is a long post but it is Mental Health Awareness week in Canada and it is important to know the struggle with mental illness and pain is complex and we do have the capacity to cope with both.

What to do? Well, my answer initially when the pain got beyond my coping strategies was push through the pain hoping there was something in the near future (always a year away it seemed and when it came? Never something that was in any way beneficial to me).  So push through the pain again. And longer. It began to affect my mood. Then some of the medications they put me on made that mood worse. Finally, depression. Pain management is fundamental. I get there isn't a…

Adapting to pain? I would hope so!

I have an interesting study that states the ability to withstand more pain is an adaptive process. We all know that it is. We know it does it with pain because we endure a vast amount of it and we cope with it as time passes. Not even sure how long it takes before our tolerance begins to grow but it is a natural process. This suggests a physical adaptive process.  Although, since it is a small study they would need to dig deeper.

The small study was published in Pain.
When the researchers used heat on the men and women’s skin to induce pain, they found that the more opioid receptors they had, the greater their ability to handle pain. These receptors were higher among the people with arthritis, which the researchers say suggests that this increase is an adaptive response, possibly to make it easier to deal with the chronic pain that comes with such a condition.
The researchers did not prove that arthritis pain increases the numbers of these receptors, but lead study au…